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TUTURIAL: Double Cross Pely - Build Goto page 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7  Next
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Fore Check
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PostPosted: Sun Jan 10, 2010 8:24 pm    Post subject: TUTURIAL: Double Cross Pely - Build Reply with quote

Anyone wanna build a kite? Cool


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Fore Check
Grand Champion, Kite, & Kitebuilder of the Year 09
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PostPosted: Sun Jan 10, 2010 8:25 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Come on - you know you want to. Very Happy It’s a cool cellular kite based on a cross-deck and a Pely. This model is about 85” tall on the Longerons and about the same across the spreaders.
















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PostPosted: Sun Jan 10, 2010 8:27 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Are you in? Great! Very Happy

This kite started with an idea that I floated a couple of months ago here: http://www.kitebuilder.com/forums/viewtopic.php?t=8386

To build one, it all starts with the sails. I uploaded some templates the Dropbox in PDF format. There’s 2 major templates - the wings and the cell panels. I made ‘em with that 3.5% curved edge. The cell panels are basically truncated wings panels - with the “tip” cut off at 2/3 the distance from the root chord at the Longeron.

This is the time to decide on your graphics. In the original concept drawings that I threw together, I used inset panels similar to what I did on my Andromeda Px9. I also toyed with solid panels in a variety of layouts. One that looked interesting would have been to use a darker color for the “front” or “face” cell panels, and a lighter shade of the same color for the “rear” cell panels (like dark blue and light blue; or flourescent green and regular green, or orange and red) and a 3rd, contrasting color for the wings. Heck, I’m sure most of you are loads more creative than I am when it comes to colors and graphics. Wink I’m still sorting out that whole “left vs. right” brain thing.

I will say this: the more simple the color scheme you go with, the more forgiving the build process is. I *like* my 4 color stripes. But, they added to the level of work exponentially. d'oh! See, when marking and cutting your panels for assembly, I’ve got lines marked for tight Longeron tunnels. As Popeye has correctly pointed out elsewhere, precision is everything. On a solid-colored kite (let’s say) - all you’d have to worry about is lining up your construction lines and sewing. Not bad. On a striped layout like I did, you not only have to align the construction lines, but also the seams for all your striped panels so that they meet at the panel intersections. It’s just one more thing you have to line up. Not bad, and on one hand, it gives more visual markers for proper alignment. On the other, it’s more to fuss with.

Anyway - a word on fabric bias. I built this and suggest that the fabric bias orientation be parallel to the Longerons and spreaders. That said, with my stripes being 45 degrees to those, I cut all the strips on the bias. It was a *lot* of measure, mark, cut, and repeat.

There are 20 panels on this kite, and with 4 colors, I cut it out as 80 strips that I flat-felled together into panel pieces that were larger than my template.

You also want to pay attention to the front-back of the fabric. I made half of the wing panels and half of the cell panels as “mirrors” of each other for this reason.

Here’s a pic of one of the panels, strips assembled, before having the template applied and final marking and cutting (cell phone pic - sorry)


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Last edited by Fore Check on Mon Dec 27, 2010 1:43 am; edited 2 times in total
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PostPosted: Sun Jan 10, 2010 8:28 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

A word on Longeron tunnels, as that figures into the panel layout up front.

I like *tight* Longeron tunnels. I’ve found, for me, that if you’re going to roll a Longeron tunnel, the amount of fabric that works good is equal to the diameter of the Longeron, times pi, + 0.2 inches (rounded to the nearest 0.1 inch.) Am I being fussy? Maybe - but it works. Very Happy That said, you need to decide on what you’re using for longerons up front and mark your sail panels accordingly. I decided to use SS P300 for longerons. I have plenty of other kites built with tight tunnels for those, and I know that the circumference of a good tunnel for P300 should be 1.2”.

Now, to make things slightly more complicated, the two tunnels on the sides that have the wings inserted in them are constructed as a rolled tunnel. That means that you have a “front” cell panel sewn to a “back” cell panel, and when done, the attachment seam needs to be centered between lines that are 1.2” apart. So half of the cell panels are marked and cut with 0.6” tunnel allowance (construction line.)

The center Longeron is in a “sandwich” style tunnel. Basically 4 sail panels intersect with a tight tunnel in the middle. The front and back of the left side of the Longeron will get sewn together with the attachment seam centered between construction lines that are 0.6” apart (0.3” tunnel allowance construction lines) and then the front and back panels at the right side of the Longeron are put together the same way. Then the two halves will be sewn together on two parallel seams that are 0.6” apart (so the tunnel circumference is 1.2”)

Make sense? Thought so. Rolling Eyes

Suffice it to say that half of your panels will have a tunnel construction line of ½ of the Longeron tunnel circumference as an offset, and half of your panels will have a tunnel construction line of ¼ o the Longeron tunnel circumference as an offset. Don’t forget that half of each of those need to be mirrors of each other.

Planning, planning, planning - and it starts up front.

I mark all the panels with two lines at the Longeron chord. One of which will be where the finished seam is, the other is my flat-fell construction seam to join the panel pieces together with a seam allowance outside of it. I went with a ½” (ish) seam allowance. This is the space that gets folded over and sewn down in the flat-fell. After the flat-fell is sewn down, the extra material is cut off in the same way as cut-away in the applique process.

The wings only need one line marked on them. This line is for alignment with the construction sew line in the rolled tunnel for the edge panels during assembly. I left a big seam allowance on it (like 1”) and actually incorporated it into the flat fell construction seam of those edge panels for extra security, but I’m not sure that was necessary. It will make sense as I go along.

So again, decide on your graphics. Build that into your sail panels now. Decide on your longerons. The dimension is critical to your templates and construction lines. The templates I will put up later will be for SSP300 longerons, but I can help anyone come up with a recommended dimension for some other spar.

Make your templates (your preferred method) and mark, then cut. Here’s mine after marking and trimming. I’ve got 4 wings, 8 cell panels that have a 0.6” tunnel allowance (half of which are “mirrored” on the colors) and 8 cell panels with a 0.3” tunnel allowance (half of which are “mirrored” on the colors.)





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Last edited by Fore Check on Sun Jan 10, 2010 11:05 pm; edited 1 time in total
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PostPosted: Sun Jan 10, 2010 8:29 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

The next step is sail corner reinforcement. I used 3.9 oz Dacron for this.

I have this 4.2” diameter alternator bracket that I got from AutoZone that I use for a circle hot-cut template that I really like for making my corner patches. I also like to lay RSN under the Dacron when cutting the circles to weld a cover piece to them to “hide” them a bit and get better color continuity in the finished build. I figured I needed 17 circles for this sliced up, and here’s some pics:

First, lay some rsn under the Dacron sheet and put your template over it for a hot cut:



You’ll notice I have tick marks at, say, 12, 3, 6, and 9 oclock on the template. Make a tick mark on your circle before removing the template.



Here’s what you end up with after peeling them off the cutting surface:



Half of my cell corners are orange and half yellow, so I’ve got multiple color circles:



I’ve got one circle flipped back over, and you can see a line penciled right down the middle. This is done with a straight edge between two of the tick marks you made when cutting them out. Draw that line, then spin the ruler to go between the other two tick marks and make a little “x” at the center of the circle to mark its position.
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PostPosted: Sun Jan 10, 2010 8:30 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Now we cut a circle in half on the line you marked. The rest of the cuts on these I do cold with an x-acto (style) knife. The remainder of the cuts will be bound and hot cutting isn’t necessary. The weld between the RSN and Dacron that was made in the initial hot cut will hold things together during assembly.



Now use one of your cut out sail pieces as the template to cut the reinforcement piece the rest of the way. Lay one straight edge of the half-circle under the sail, with the sail corner right on the center point of the Dacron that you marked earlier.



Mark the Dacron at the edge of the sail (right by my thumb in that pic). Then use a straight edge and cut between that mark and the center mark. You get a big pie wedge. Apply ¼” double sided tape to each straight edge like so:



Then align and tape to the *back* of the sail on the corner:



Repeat until you’ve got all the corners covered, then take them to the machine and sew them down. I use same colored thread and a triple zig-zag stitch. You only need to sew around the arc, not the straight edges.



The exact process is done for the wing tips, just that the piece of pie is shaped smaller.





You end up with a bunch of reinforced corners:



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PostPosted: Sun Jan 10, 2010 8:30 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Now it’s time for edge binding (HOORAY!) Laughing

I use single-folded ¾” wide strips of 0.75 oz rsn. That means I need to hot cut them. Use your preferred edge binding and methods. I used about 28 strips at 48” long each. I didn’t spend much time talking about edge binding (can be found lots of other places.)

Here’s my cut strips:



And after a bit of work, here’s all the bound pieces.




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PostPosted: Sun Jan 10, 2010 8:31 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Now for the wing tip loops. I sew down loops of ¼” grosgrain that will serve both as a spreader loop (spreader goes through it) and a place to tie a string to pull over a nock on the spreader tip for sail tension.

Cut yourself a piece of grosgrain 4.5” long, with marks at 1.5” intervals. I suggest using the same color as your edge binding.



Then cut a piece of ds tape about (I suggest a bit *less*) than 1.5” long, and split it down the middle like so:



Flip your grosgrain over so the marks are face down, and apply the tape to each end with that 1.5” gap in the middle:



Now start applying the grosgrain to the wing tips. Lay one end right down the edge, aligning your mark with the wing tip:




Then remove the backing from the other piece of tape, roll it around and lay the other half down:




Then take to the machine and sew them down. I use 2 parallel straight stitches on each leg.


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PostPosted: Sun Jan 10, 2010 8:32 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Now we need to apply the patches for and make the spreader pass-throughs on the back cell panels.

I like to use same colored, same weight rsn as the sail panels. They go right at the midpoint of the longeron chord line. I have a color change right at that point, so this was made a little more tedious for me, but it doesn’t have to be (depends on your color scheme.)

You’ll need 8 patches that will get applied to the back or “inside” of the sail. I’ll have the little template that I used made up too and uploaded to the DropBox.



You’ll notice that the square hole is about 1/16” above or off of the sew line (which gets matched to the construction line on your sail.) There’s a reason for this; I’ve found that it helps TREMENDOUSLY to get good sail tension and minimize stress wrinkles if you leave a little bit of meat there, particularly when you know you’re going to apply some good tension along the Longeron and thus that sew line.

These pieces get put on applique style to the sail. I use 3M spray mount adhesive, sprayed to the patch and then stick them to the sail. Then I use an applique simple zig zag stitch to go around the perimeter of the patch with color matched thread. NOTE: The square hole is not cut until AFTER the patch is completely sewn down. After zigzagging the patch on, switch to a straight stitch and sew around the square, using the pencil lines as a guide and sewing about 1/16” *outside* the pencil lines. After sewing completely, cut out the square. I cold cut it (done this a bunch - plenty stable, the straight stitches are important in reinforcing the hole and the cut)



You do this for half of your cell panels, paying attention the mirror images for color continuity and the different tunnel allowances (half of each type of panel)


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Last edited by Fore Check on Wed Jan 20, 2010 10:33 am; edited 1 time in total
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PostPosted: Sun Jan 10, 2010 8:32 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Now, when I edge bind, I don’t trim the tags off of the ends completely to make sure I get them trimmed right. It’s time to cut them off. A trick is to lay the panel on the table, put your straight edge on the construction/marking lines that you drew when you cut the panel out initially, and extend those lines out over the edge binding.



Then use your straight edge between the sail corner you can see and the end of the line you just extended and trim off the binding tag.


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PostPosted: Sun Jan 10, 2010 8:33 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Now it’s time to start assembling the panels with a flat-fell seam. What we’re going to make here is 8 sail pieces that will then either be rolled or sandwiched later in final construction, creating the Longeron tunnels at that point. What we’re doing is attaching the “front” to “back” pieces.

A light table helps a lot with this. Mine is ULTRA cheap: A glass-top patio table with a table lamp set on the floor under it Laughing

In this pic I’ve selected two pieces that will be on the center longeron (0.3” tunnel allowance.) The process is the same for the outer pieces with the rolled tunnel.

Lay them BACK to BACK with the faces OUT and line them up.



Take them to the machine and straight stitch them together on the line that is marked and shown in the BOTTOM of that pic above (NOT the final tunnel seam line!)

After the stitch, open them out flat, fold the seam allowance over, and sew it down to create the flat-fell. The tag will be on the TOP or FACE side of the panels at this point. In final assembly, this will place it on the INSIDE of the Longeron tunnel.



(Idiot me, I took a picture of the backside of these panels after assembly, but hey)
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Last edited by Fore Check on Mon Jan 11, 2010 2:59 pm; edited 1 time in total
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PostPosted: Sun Jan 10, 2010 8:33 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I mentioned previously that I made things slightly more complicated for myself by attaching the wing to the outside cell pieces in this construction step (so there’s three panels being joined by the flat fell.) Not sure this is necessary, but I wanted to do it. If you choose to do this, make sure you align the seam mark of the wing with the line closest to the spar pass through hole on the sail panel, and then sew them together on the other line (not marked on the wing.) Confusing? It will make sense if you try it.

Getting there…






Step complete


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PostPosted: Sun Jan 10, 2010 8:34 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Now we need to put some Dacron reinforcement on each end of what will be the tunnels for those 8 pieces (so 16 more pieces of reinforcement.) These strips should be narrower than your tunnel allowance so that they are contained inside of your finished tunnels. I went with 1” wide and 0.5” wide respectively.

I also made ‘em 2” long. Why? I have some 2” Dacron rolls and it was convenient. Laughing And it works.

So, cut up a bunch of strips. Half of them at 1” and the other half at 0.5”. I made ‘em half white and half black because half or getting applied to black fabric.



Then use your ds tape and stick ‘em to the ends of the sails, between the tunnel construction lines. MAKE SURE you are taping them to the “font” or “face” side of the fabric.







Don’t bother with sewing the Dacron down here; it’ll get secured in the next step.
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PostPosted: Sun Jan 10, 2010 8:35 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Now we need grosgrain to hold things together and give us some anchor loops for Longeron tension. These pics are of the edge cells (with the wider, rolled tunnel) because my wife had the camera when I was doing the center, narrower, sandwich tunnel (Rolling Eyes )

Cut a piece of ¼” grosgrain 4” long, with a mark 1.5” in from each end (1” gap between the marks.)



Then tape it to the end of the tunnel that will be the top or nose of the kite. Align the marks you made with the end of the tunnel. Space the grosgrain evenly (or approximately evenly) from the edges of the patch and the centerline of the tunnel. Use the taping method I described for the wing tip loops (cut the ds tape in half lengthwise)



Repeat this 4 times so you get the same thing on what will be the top and bottom of the kite on the four corners (two outside longerons)
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PostPosted: Sun Jan 10, 2010 8:35 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Now, switch to 3/8” grosgrain for the pieces that will attach the top half of the kite to the bottom half of the kite in what will be the center of the Longeron tunnel.

Cut two pieces that are 3” long. Put a mark at the midpoint. Flip over, and apply a couple pieces of DS tape. If you use 3/8” grosgrain for this, you don’t need to cut the ds tape in half lengthwise.



Now apply two pieces side by side to the other patch. I suggest doing this on what you’ve determined to be the top-left piece of the kite and the top-right piece of the kite.



Then go sew all that grosgrain down. I use 2 parallel straight stitches on each leg.

After it’s all sewn down, we now attach the bottom half to the top half. Butt the two tunnel ends together that will be attached, and remove the backing from the tape on the half of the 3/8” grosgrain you sewed down a minute ago, and tape it to the Dacron on the bottom tunnel. Sew it down.


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PostPosted: Sun Jan 10, 2010 8:36 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Doing the center panels (with the narrower, 0.3” tunnel allowance) is *basically* the same, but *slightly* more complicated.

You have 4 panels that you joined (used to be 8 ) that will be, as you think or look at the center Longeron, the top left, the top right, the bottom left, and the bottom right (with that center Longeron running down the middle of them)

You work with them in terms of the left side pair and the right side pair.

You use a single piece of 3/8” grosgrain to join the top piece to the bottom piece on each side (left and right.)

For the ¼” loop that will be at each end of the finished tunnel, you sew down one leg of the grosgrain to each end of the left side pieces (top and bottom) with the other end of the grosgrain left dangling. Then you bring the right side top to the left side top and sew it down with that 1” gap between them (similar how you do the 3/8” in the center but with a gap.) Then bring the bottoms together and do the same thing, but it takes a bit of kung fu. You will end up with the grosgrain sewn to the “face” of the pieces and Dacron, and then those will be face-to-face on the *inside* of the tunnel when you sandwich it together.
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Last edited by Fore Check on Sun Jan 10, 2010 10:49 pm; edited 1 time in total
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PostPosted: Sun Jan 10, 2010 8:36 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Before doing the sandwich or making the rolled tunnel, we want to add retention loops for the spreader.

I used ¼” grosgrain 2” long, with marks at ½” in from each end (1” gap in the middle.)

This makes a TIGHT (I.e. secure) loop for 8mm Carbon, my pre-selected spreader.



Tape it down with little bits of ds tape aligning the marks with the seam construction lines, centered at your spar pass-through patch.



You’ll do this 6 times. One at each pass through on the rolled tunnels and wings (4 there) and 2 more on the center Longeron. I suggest doing them both on either the “left” or the “right” half of the sandwich pieces (top and bottom both, same side but one side only.)
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PostPosted: Sun Jan 10, 2010 8:37 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Now to make Longeron tunnels and things really start to come together.


When making the sandwich, you will line it up and make two parallel stitches.



You are doing this Face to Face (with the backside of the fabric OUT) and all the grosgrain and patches on the inside.





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PostPosted: Sun Jan 10, 2010 8:38 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Rolling the tunnels with the wing is the same idea, just with one stitch instead of 2 parallel. The wing ends up on the inside of the tunnel with the faces of the fabric for the cell panels together. Pay attention, the wing goes face-to-face with the front cell panel.

EDIT: I built the kite by initially attaching the wings to the outside cell pieces by incorporating it into the flat-fell seam that joined the cell pieces together. You don't *have* to do it that way. If you chose not to, you need to put the wing into rolled tunnel now before sewing it together. Take your cell pieces and lay them on the table face-up (with the "back" of the fabric DOWN) Bring in your wing piece and lay it, face UP, over the panel which will be the BACK of the kite (the one with the spar pass-through) - aligning the construction line you originally drew on the wing with the construction line on the back cell panel. Use some DS tape in the seam allowance to keep things together and aligned. Then roll the FRONT cell panel over aligning all 3 construction lines. At this point, the back cell panel and wing will be face-UP and the front cell panel will be face-DOWN. Keep it together and straight stitch down your construction line attaching all 3 pieces together and creating that rolled tunnel.


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Last edited by Fore Check on Wed Jan 20, 2010 10:47 am; edited 1 time in total
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PostPosted: Sun Jan 10, 2010 8:39 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

So, now you’ve got 3 big pieces. The left side of the kite, the center, and the right side.

It’s time to attach them all with twisted pairs of ¼” grosgrain across the cell corners.

This is the tedious ninjitsu of the whole process.

First we need 32 pieces of ¼” grosgrain at 3.75” long. There will be a mark at 1.5” in from each end of the piece on opposing faces of the strip. It really helps to have a little measuring template for this.



I made a mark at the 3.75” and at 1.5”.

Lay the grosgrain on the template and mark at both places.



Then cut at the 3.75” mark. Flip it over, and make a mark at the 1.5” mark again.



What you end up with a piece with 0.75” between the marks, with the marks on opposite sides of the strip.



…and 32 of ‘em.



Finally, we gotta put the tape to ‘em. Do the split down the middle technique with tape a bit under 1.5” in length. Apply the tape to the OPPOSITE end of the strip from the mark as shown:



So you’re applying tape to the opposite end, opposite face of each piece of ribbon.
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